Reflective Learners

I’ve been doing a fair bit of reading of late around the idea of reflective practice. Love it or hate the idea there is definitely some consensus around the fact that if you revisit something and think about it again, you often gain a deeper understanding about it. I have always tried to put this idea into practice in the classroom. I remember becoming really frustrated when I attempted to mark significant pieces of writing alongside the children, individually. I simply didn’t have enough time in the school day yet I could see that revisiting the work with them (albeit with me guiding the discussion) made the comments and edits far more meaningful to the children.

With all of that in mind I suggested an idea today to one class where reflecting on their work could become an integral part of their day to day learning. It came form looking at the awesome app that is Storyrobe. It doesn’t do much but what it does it does brilliantly (it is discussed with some examples in the Apps section). I was getting across the point today with the Y6 class that you should rarely narrate over pictures or videos without planning, redrafting, editing and having checked your “script” first. The BBC never would so aim high. Whilst searching for examples of when you cold do it off the cuff, I suggested that children could take a photo of a piece of work that they have done then narrate over it. I suppose it is like those DVD extras you get where the director talks over the film, explaining aspects of why the film is the way it is at each point. The children could do a quick review of what they think they have done successfully in that piece, and what they feel they need more work on. That short video can then simply be added to the child’s skydrive folder where it is shared with the teacher. Done regularly this would ensure that children reflect on work they have done, often with a criteria to talk to. The teacher liked the idea and suggested it might help her marking sometimes to hear the child’s view on the work while she is looking at it, usually outside of the classroom. I haven’t suggested that the mark could come back as a narrative yet…let’s see how this works first.

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