Keeping up

I have been working with a diverse range of situations over the last few weeks and I hope my brief discussion below helps to identify useful techniques that may apply to your own use of mobile devices from the outset.

The key to effective use is to identify how they help us to learn. That is always the focus of my first session with a group of new users and it is a theme I continually revisit. The idea of the data hoover that becomes your second brain is paramount and is the reason for using it is documented at length elsewhere in the archives of this blog. One class that I am supporting is in an unusual situation that is now becoming more common; the children have used the devices with a keen teacher the year before and have now come into a class where the teacher has no experience of them at all. I have tackled this in a number of ways:

  • Little and often sessions for the teacher so that she has time to integrate an idea into her existing practise before being introduced to the next
  • Open forum with the children to identify what helps them to learn when using the devices
  • An openness with the class that the teacher needs their help to make the best use of the device for learning
  • Off the peg ideas with demonstration for things like “handing out a picture and receiving descriptive work back” – ipod style!
  • Focussed discussion with the teacher whilst the children are doing a task so that it forms the “director’s commentary” to the lesson she is watching
  • Additional focussed time with the teacher outside of the classroom to consolidate what she thinks she has found useful and what she feels she needs more of in a less public setting – i.e., not in front of the class
  • Begin each support session specifically addressing an issue that has arisen since the last in school support session

This range of techniques to support the teacher has been developed over a number of years and a LOT of experience. I find it helps support teachers who are really keen to use the devices and have even been the instigator to acquiring them….to the teacher who has inherited them and would possibly like one less thing to worry about. I use the same openness with the children regardless of whether or not they have used the devices before in school, 20 odd minds, focussing on “How can this help us learn?” are vital in making the integration of devices as effective as possible.

To give some context, this week the teacher I was supporting had had some problems writing a newspaper article in Mental Note as it went over three pages when it became a pdf – which looked daft. I addressed that with the children straight away and several suggested what I had had thought, Strip Design is a far better tool for organising a page with multiple text boxes and possibly fonts and images. So we spent 5 minutes just demonstrating that…some children led parts of the demo too. Knowing that allows the teacher to make appropriate decisions going forward in terms of which app to use to produce which format of a finished piece. She immediately identified to the children several future uses for the app for types of writing that they had been working on.

That is important, the devices are there to support and enhance what teachers do well. You do not sit there with a device “what can I do with this?” there lies madness. You sit there, plan the work the children will do and identify opportunities for the devices to enhance that experience. That i what I am doing on Tuesday afternoon now that she has had several short and sharp in class support sessions. We will sit and look at her planning, possibly for January, to identify how we develop the use of the devices to enhance the learning experience. As they are going to be studying Ancient Greece as their main topic I can already see how research into the Olympic Games will allow eyewitness news reports via the Green Screen Studio app live from Olympia circa 500 BC!

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